January 28, 2023

4 Exciting Skincare Things Coming In 2022 – British Vogue

Back when the term “unprecedented times” seemed wildly imaginative, if we’d asked our hypothetical crystal balls, “What is the future of skincare?” the response would have been “Tech.” Cue a futuristic cosmos where our current formulations, regimes and devices, now rendered prosaic and insufficient, would be elevated by the kind of innovation you’d expect from Nasa. That forecast isn’t erroneous per se, but it doesn’t consider the pandemic, which caused a seismic shift in …….

Back when the term “unprecedented times” seemed wildly imaginative, if we’d asked our hypothetical crystal balls, “What is the future of skincare?” the response would have been “Tech.” Cue a futuristic cosmos where our current formulations, regimes and devices, now rendered prosaic and insufficient, would be elevated by the kind of innovation you’d expect from Nasa. That forecast isn’t erroneous per se, but it doesn’t consider the pandemic, which caused a seismic shift in our relationship with our body’s largest organ. So, what is the future? Well, according to the world’s skincare experts, everything from self-care and science to transparency and tech will have a starring role. 

Healthcare benefits

Much has been said about how the fragility of our existence staring us squarely in the face caused us to take a more holistic look at our skincare choices. Charles Rosier, CEO and co-founder of Augustinus Bader, is unequivocal that this health-focused approach will be vital going forward, explaining that consumers will increasingly think of “skincare as skin health”. Victoria Campbell, general manager of Murad Skincare UK, couldn’t agree more, predicting that “facial treatments will be deemed less a luxury and more of a necessity in the journey for the best possible skin health”. It is a trajectory that Sarah Chapman, A-list aesthetician and founder of the Skinesis line, is already witnessing at her Chelsea clinic. “Clients are more focused on their skin’s underlying health, not just its superficial appearance,” she says. As a result, hygiene has become a heightened area of concern for consumers. Clare Varga, head of beauty at WGSN, predicts that as a result, we’ll see “a more personalised and fresh approach to skincare, as it will not only be considered more potent, it will be more hygienic”. Chapman concurs, adding that this emphasis will also cause brands to “move towards packaging that minimises the risk of contamination”. Skinesis – with its airless bottles and single-use microneedling tips – already has a head start.

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Tech boom

Lately, sales of at-home skincare devices have skyrocketed – and Chapman, who advocates their use as part of an effective skincare regime, predicts interest will continue to rise. “I foresee great strides in this area, with technology previously only seen in clinical settings being adapted for personal use,” she says. Meanwhile, Shani Darden, the LA-based aesthetician, explains that this enthusiasm for tech is being galvanised by a “prevention is better than cure” mantra. She says, “Utilising effective at-home devices along with the right products for your skin can really counteract premature ageing, helping to minimise …….

Source: https://www.vogue.co.uk/beauty/article/skincare-future-post-covid