January 28, 2023

UK skincare industry on diversity mission as 56% of non-whites don’t feel represented – The Mirror

New research reveals that 56 per cent of non-white UK beauty consumers don’t feel represented by the skincare industry. So what can be done? Vikki Whitereports

With cosmetics selling well again after lockdown, the UK beauty industry h…….

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New research reveals that 56 per cent of non-white UK beauty consumers don’t feel represented by the skincare industry. So what can be done? Vikki Whitereports

With cosmetics selling well again after lockdown, the UK beauty industry has a new, important focus.

Brands at the forefront of our make-up and skincare scene are more determined than ever to make beauty accessible for everyone.

As part of the Mirror’s Black History Month coverage we spoke to Munnawar Chishty, Vice President of Beauty at No7 Beauty Company (no7company.co.uk) to find out how the firm is placing DnI, diversity and inclusion, front and centre.

“When I started in the beauty industry, I’ll be honest, it was a big deal that Naomi Campbell was on the cover of Vogue,” says Munnawar. “I could find a foundation shade range that matched my skin, but it didn’t have my yellow undertone. I was still doing a bit of lipstick under my eye to cover the bags.

Munnawar Chishty is on a mission

“There wasn’t anybody that I saw in a magazine that represented who I was.

“Now Priyanka Chopra (the 39-year-old Indian actress and model) is in some adverts, you see a wide range of models on telly and the products are more diverse.

“You’ve had amazing brands come through, but there is still more to do and I feel privileged to be in a position where I can be part of that change.”

The UK began celebrating Black History Month, an idea first spawned in the United States and then also adopted by European countries including Ireland and the Netherlands, in October 1987.

Black History Month helps give context to modern life and the country’s history, while championing the experiences and celebrating the contributions of Black Britons here in the UK.

The observation was first organised through the leadership of Ghanaian-born analyst Akyaaba Addai-Sebo. He served as a coordinator of special projects for the Greater London Council.

Consequently, Akyaaba created a plan aiming to recognise the contributions of African, Asian and Caribbean people to the economic, cultural and political …….

Source: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/uk-skincare-industry-diversity-mission-25314348